Friday, January 22, 2010


Stephen Asma in the Chronicle Review of Higher Education:
Feeling unworthy is still a large part of Western religious culture, but many people, especially in multicultural urban centers, are less religious. There are still those who believe that God is watching them and judging them, so their feelings of guilt and moral indignation are couched in the traditional theological furniture. But increasing numbers, in the middle and upper classes, identify themselves as being secular or perhaps "spiritual" rather than religious.

Now the secular world still has to make sense out of its own invisible, psychological drama--in particular, its feelings of guilt and indignation. Environmentalism, as a substitute for religion, has come to the rescue. Nietzsche's argument about an ideal God and guilt can be replicated in a new form: We need a belief in a pristine environment because we need to be cruel to ourselves as inferior beings, and we need that because we have these aggressive instincts that cannot be let out.

Instead of religious sins plaguing our conscience, we now have the transgressions of leaving the water running, leaving the lights on, failing to recycle, and using plastic grocery bags instead of paper. In addition, the righteous pleasures of being more orthodox than your neighbor (in this case being more green) can still be had--the new heresies include failure to compost, or refusal to go organic. Vitriol that used to be reserved for Satan can now be discharged against evil corporate chief executives and drivers of gas-guzzling vehicles. Apocalyptic fear-mongering previously took the shape of repent or burn in hell, but now it is recycle or burn in the ozone hole. In fact, it is interesting the way environmentalism takes on the apocalyptic aspects of the traditional religious narrative. The idea that the end is nigh is quite central to traditional Christianity--it is a jolting wake-up call to get on the righteous path. And we find many environmentalists in a similarly earnest panic about climate change and global warming.


Anonymous said...

Because of the same spiritual dynamic, many secular American lefties treat the US as a scapegoat. I'm using scapegoat in its Lev. 16 sense: they off-load the weight of their sins onto the nation's head, and try to put as much psychological distance as possible between themselves and the goat.

--Scurvy Oaks

Bindle, High Priest of Gaian Truth said...

As a religious concept, I might be able to get behind this gaian concept, though I find the rest of the whole "guilt/original sin" concept to be rather absurd:

Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for I am the meanest motherf******r in the valley.